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David Sherlock's Blog

Halo 3: Pay to play (then pay some more)

Every year I pay £40 to microsoft for the privilage to play my Xbox Live games online. I dont mind paying the money too much considering live is far ahead of PSN (although I think sony are closing the gap) . When I spend £40 on a game that says I can play it on Xbox Live I expect to be able to play the game I have purchased for quite a while; I understand that eventualy I won’t be able to: A) The popularity of the game will dwindle; meaning I can no longer play whacked simply because there is nobody to play it with. B) Not enough people play to justify server support and it is pulled, sometimes I am ok with this (as with PSO, which I played for free for yonks on Sega servers) and sometimes it pisses me off (EA decide you have to buy…

Widgets for Wookie: Getting Started

Update: Downloading and running Wookie has changed since this was written and some of the links seem broken. please check http://incubator.apache.org/wookie/downloading-and-installing-wookie.html for latest instructions The Wookie server is open source software in development for delivering collaborative widgets that follows the w3c widget specification. Although it is early days for Wookie I desperately wanted to try my hand at writing some widgets; along the way I found that online tutorials were often written for specific platforms (Yahoo, Mac, etc) and it was quite daunting for the first few attempts. Getting Started First you will need download and install the Widget Server.  The easiest method is to use the ‘Quick Start Distribution’ which is offered by the  Tencompetence Website and includes: CopperCore Runtime Environment(CCRT) Sled Player Widget Server The Quick Start Distribution is available here Once you have downloaded the environment unzip it with your favorite compression tool and run the file…

Can you have my attention please?

Recently I have been writing a browser extension that keeps track of my activities and the web-based resources I use. I found that the data it collected was actually very valuable to me, it created a mini attention profile and by pushing this into various JavaScript libraries I was able to produce pretty graphs that showed a great deal about the way I work. During the experience I realized it would be advantageous if I could do two things; Export this information to a service that could make further recommendations on resources that could improve my working habits. Tap into the many other ‘Silos’ of information I have accumulated (del.icio.ous , last.fm etc) and use this in conjunction with data my tracker has produced. Looking for solutions to these problems brought me into the world of DataPortability which is an attempt at using various open standards (such as OAuth and…

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